Journal Article

Challenges and Successes in Linking HIV-Infected Women to Care in the United States

Mariam Aziz and Kimberly Y. Smith

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 52, issue suppl_2, pages S231-S237
Published in print January 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciq047
Challenges and Successes in Linking HIV-Infected Women to Care in the United States

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Women currently account for 27% of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in the United States, the majority of which are acquired through heterosexual transmission. In the United States, black and Latino persons are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic, a disparity that is most dramatically present among HIV-infected women. Many of these women face significant discrimination as a result of race or ethnicity and sex, and they suffer disproportionately from poverty, low health literacy, and lack of access to high-quality HIV care. As a consequence, despite the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), women with HIV often have delayed entry into care and experience poor outcomes. This article reviews risk factors for HIV infection in women, barriers to engagement in care, and strategies to improve linkage to HIV-related medical and social care.

Journal Article.  5057 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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