Journal Article

Attribution of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection to Primary Versus Non-Primary Maternal Infection

Chengbin Wang, Xingyou Zhang, Stephanie Bialek and Michael J. Cannon

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 52, issue 2, pages e11-e13
Published in print January 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online January 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciq085
Attribution of Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection to Primary Versus Non-Primary Maternal Infection

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Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of developmental disabilities. In the United States during the period 1988–1994, approximately one-quarter of congenital CMV infections were attributable to primary maternal infection (n = 8772), and three-quarters were attributable to non-primary maternal infection (n = 29,918). Effective prevention strategies need to be developed for both primary and non-primary maternal infections.

Journal Article.  1540 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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