Journal Article

Increased Rates of Bone Fracture Among HIV-Infected Persons in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS) Compared With the US General Population, 2000–2006

Benjamin Young, Christine N. Dao, Kate Buchacz, Rose Baker and John T. Brooks

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 52, issue 8, pages 1061-1068
Published in print April 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciq242
Increased Rates of Bone Fracture Among HIV-Infected Persons in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS) Compared With the US General Population, 2000–2006

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Background. Among persons with HIV infection, low bone mineral density is common and has raised concerns about increased risk of fracture.

Methods. We analyzed data from the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS), an open prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults who were followed up at 10 US HIV clinics. We assessed rates of first fractures at any anatomic site during the period 2000–2008. We indirectly standardized the rates of fracture in the HOPS to the general population by age and sex, using data from outpatients in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS-OPD). We examined factors associated with fractures using Cox proportional hazards modeling.

Results. Among 5826 active HOPS patients whose data were analyzed (median baseline age, 40 years; male sex, 79%; white race, 52%; exposure to antiretroviral therapy, 73%), 233 patients had incident fractures (crude annual rates, 59.6–93.5 fractures per 10,000 persons). Age-standardized fracture rates increased from 2000 to 2002 (P = .01) and stabilized thereafter. Among persons aged 25–54 years, both fracture rates and relative proportion of fragility fractures were higher among HOPS patients than among patients in the NHAMCS-OPD. In addition to older age and substance abuse, nadir CD4+ cell count <200 cells/mm3 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–2.31), hepatitis C infection (aHR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.13–2.29) and diabetes (aHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.00–2.64) were associated with incident fractures.

Conclusions. Age-adjusted fracture rates among HOPS patients were higher than rates in the general US population during the period 2000–2006. Clinicians should regularly assess HIV-infected persons for fracture risk, especially those with low nadir CD4+ cell counts or other established risk factors for fracture.

Journal Article.  3412 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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