Journal Article

<i>Candida</i> Urinary Tract Infections—Epidemiology

Jack D. Sobel, John F. Fisher, Carol A. Kauffman and Cheryl A. Newman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 52, issue suppl_6, pages S433-S436
Published in print May 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cir109
Candida Urinary Tract Infections—Epidemiology

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Candiduria is rarely present in healthy individuals. In contrast, it is a common finding in hospitalized patients, especially those in intensive care units (ICUs) who often have multiple predisposing factors, including diabetes mellitus, indwelling urinary catheters, and exposure to antimicrobials. Candiduria occurs much less commonly in the community setting. In a majority of episodes in adult patients in critical care facilities candiduria represents colonization, and antifungal therapy is not required. However, the presence of yeast in the urine can be a sign of a disseminated infection. In the critically ill newborn, candiduria often reflects disseminated candidiasis and is accompanied by obstructing fungus ball formation in the urinary tract. In ICU patients, although candiduria is a marker for increased mortality, it is only rarely attributable to Candida urinary tract infection.

Journal Article.  2134 words. 

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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