Journal Article

Clinical Applications of DNA Vaccines: Current Progress

Bernadette Ferraro, Matthew P. Morrow, Natalie A. Hutnick, Thomas H. Shin, Colleen E. Lucke and David B. Weiner

Edited by Stanley Plotkin

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 53, issue 3, pages 296-302
Published in print August 2011 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2011 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cir334
Clinical Applications of DNA Vaccines: Current Progress

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It was discovered almost 20 years ago that plasmid DNA, when injected into the skin or muscle of mice, could induce immune responses to encoded antigens. Since that time, there has since been much progress in understanding the basic biology behind this deceptively simple vaccine platform and much technological advancement to enhance immune potency. Among these advancements are improved formulations and improved physical methods of delivery, which increase the uptake of vaccine plasmids by cells; optimization of vaccine vectors and encoded antigens; and the development of novel formulations and adjuvants to augment and direct the host immune response. The ability of the current, or second-generation, DNA vaccines to induce more-potent cellular and humoral responses opens up this platform to be examined in both preventative and therapeutic arenas. This review focuses on these advances and discusses both preventive and immunotherapeutic clinical applications.

Journal Article.  4162 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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