Journal Article

Reading Optimally Builds on Spoken Language: Implications for Deaf Readers

Charles A. Perfetti and Rebecca Sandak

in The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

Volume 5, issue 1, pages 32-50
Published in print January 2000 | ISSN: 1081-4159
Published online January 2000 | e-ISSN: 1465-7325 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/deafed/5.1.32
Reading Optimally Builds on Spoken Language: Implications for Deaf
 Readers

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Education
  • Linguistics
  • Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Reading is not merely “language by eye.” Rather, it builds fundamentally on primary language processes. For hearing readers, this means that spoken language processes, including phonological processes, are critical to high achievement in reading. We examine the implications of this fact for deaf readers by considering the relationship between language and reading and by reviewing the research on the use of phonology by deaf readers. The research, although mixed in its results, suggests that the use of phonology is associated with higher levels of reading skill among deaf readers. We examine related questions, including the additional semantic and visual strategies available to deaf readers, how some deaf readers gain access to the spoken structure of language, and implications for how to improve reading achievement.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Linguistics ; Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.