Journal Article

What the Processing of Real Words and Pseudohomophones Can Tell Us about the Development of Orthographic Knowledge in Prelingually Deafened Individuals

Paul Miller

in The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

Volume 11, issue 1, pages 21-38
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 1081-4159
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1465-7325 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/deafed/enj001
What the Processing of Real Words and Pseudohomophones Can Tell Us about the Development of Orthographic Knowledge in Prelingually Deafened Individuals

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This study represents an attempt to determine the nature and efficiency of the strategies used by prelingually deafened individuals for the recognition of written words with reference to an orthographic self-teaching concept (D. L. Share, 1995). A research paradigm asking the participants to make categorical judgments for real words and pseudohomophones of the real words was used for gathering the data. Participants were prelingually deafened, native signers (n = 11, age = 14.18) and a hearing control group (n = 25, age = 15.00). In general, findings suggest that, although the participants with deafness were very impaired in their phonological decoding abilities, their efficiency in recognizing and categorizing written words was similar to that of their hearing counterparts. This suggests that they must have developed strategies for the acquisition of orthographic knowledge that do not rely on phonology.

Journal Article.  11105 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Linguistics ; Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

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