Journal Article

A Dual-Route Cascaded Model of Reading by Deaf Adults: Evidence for Grapheme to Viseme Conversion

Eeva A. Elliott, Mario Braun, Michael Kuhlmann and Arthur M. Jacobs

in The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

Volume 17, issue 2, pages 227-243
Published in print April 2012 | ISSN: 1081-4159
Published online December 2011 | e-ISSN: 1465-7325 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/deafed/enr047
A Dual-Route Cascaded Model of Reading by Deaf Adults: Evidence for Grapheme to Viseme Conversion

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Education
  • Linguistics
  • Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

There is an ongoing debate whether deaf individuals access phonology when reading, and if so, what impact the ability to access phonology might have on reading achievement. However, the debate so far has been theoretically unspecific on two accounts: (a) the phonological units deaf individuals may have of oral language have not been specified and (b) there seem to be no explicit cognitive models specifying how phonology and other factors operate in reading by deaf individuals. We propose that deaf individuals have representations of the sublexical structure of oral–aural language which are based on mouth shapes and that these sublexical units are activated during reading by deaf individuals. We specify the sublexical units of deaf German readers as 11 “visemes” and incorporate the viseme set into a working model of single-word reading by deaf adults based on the dual-route cascaded model of reading aloud by Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, and Ziegler (2001. DRC: A dual route cascaded model of visual word recognition and reading aloud. Psychological Review, 108, 204–256. doi: 10.1037//0033-295x.108.1.204). We assessed the indirect route of this model by investigating the “pseudo-homoviseme” effect using a lexical decision task in deaf German reading adults. We found a main effect of pseudo-homovisemy, suggesting that at least some deaf individuals do automatically access sublexical structure during single-word reading.

Journal Article.  10200 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Education ; Linguistics ; Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.