Journal Article

Understanding of Emotions and False Beliefs Among Hearing Children versus Deaf Children

Margalit Ziv, Tova Most and Shirit Cohen

in The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

Volume 18, issue 2, pages 161-174
Published in print April 2013 | ISSN: 1081-4159
Published online March 2013 | e-ISSN: 1465-7325 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/deafed/ens073
Understanding of Emotions and False Beliefs Among Hearing Children versus Deaf Children

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Emotion understanding and theory of mind (ToM) are two major aspects of social cognition in which deaf children demonstrate developmental delays. The current study investigated these social cognition aspects in two subgroups of deaf children—those with cochlear implants who communicate orally (speakers) and those who communicate primarily using sign language (signers)—in comparison to hearing children. Participants were 53 Israeli kindergartners—20 speakers, 10 signers, and 23 hearing children. Tests included four emotion identification and understanding tasks and one false belief task (ToM). Results revealed similarities among all children’s emotion labeling and affective perspective taking abilities, similarities between speakers and hearing children in false beliefs and in understanding emotions in typical contexts, and lower performance of signers on the latter three tasks. Adapting educational experiences to the unique characteristics and needs of speakers and signers is recommended.

Journal Article.  9245 words. 

Subjects: Education ; Linguistics ; Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

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