Journal Article

Carneades' Legacy: the Morality of Eloquence in the Humanist and Papalist Writings of Pietro del Monte

David Rundle

in The English Historical Review

Volume 117, issue 471, pages 284-305
Published in print April 2002 | ISSN: 0013-8266
Published online April 2002 | e-ISSN: 1477-4534 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehr/117.471.284
Carneades' Legacy: the Morality of Eloquence in the Humanist and Papalist Writings of Pietro del Monte

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • British History
  • World History
  • European History
  • International History

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Humanists were paid to be eloquent; they were persuasive, at the expense, it is said, of being consistent. Yet, did the humanists themselves lack a sense of the virtue of constancy and of sincerity? This article attempts to answer that question through the example of the writings of Pietro del Monte (c. 1400–1457). Del Monte, a Venetian who eventually became Bishop of Brescia (1442–1457), was the author of both humanist and canonist works. The focus of this article is particularly on the range of writings he produced while papal collector to England (1435–1440). His humanist works have been termed ‘civic humanist’, his papalist writings ‘monarchist’, but they have rarely been studied side by side. By pursuing such a comparison, what becomes notable are as much the similarities between the texts as their differences. Their apparent inconsistencies partially melt away while what remains is a constant concern for what might be called the morality of eloquence. Such a concern does not place del Monte apart from his contemporaries; on the contrary, he is surely part of the mainstream.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: British History ; World History ; European History ; International History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.