Journal Article

English Artillery 1189–1307: The Implications of Terminology

David Stewart Bachrach

in The English Historical Review

Volume CXXI, issue 494, pages 1408-1430
Published in print December 2006 | ISSN: 0013-8266
Published online December 2006 | e-ISSN: 1477-4534 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehr/cel284
English Artillery 1189–1307: The Implications of Terminology

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Scholars have long recognized that narrative texts and illustrations frequently provide a confusing and often misleading view of the types of artillery deployed by medieval military commanders. Nevertheless, up to the present these types of sources have provided the basis for most conclusions regarding medieval artillery. This study takes a different approach by making use of the vast quantity of administrative documents produced by the English government from the reign of Richard I to Edward I (1189-1307) that deal with the production and repair of artillery used by English armies in this period. These records, which represent the ‘work product’ of the men who built the king's artillery and the clerks who paid for these engines, provide many new insights regarding the types of artillery deployed by the royal government over this long century. In particular, it is possible to identify three major types of stone-throwing artillery as well as two different types of spear-casting engines, the periods in which these weapons were deployed, and when they were superseded by newer technology.

Journal Article.  11326 words. 

Subjects: British History ; World History ; European History ; International History

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