Journal Article

Piety, Profit and Public Service in the Financial Revolution

Koji Yamamoto

in The English Historical Review

Volume CXXVI, issue 521, pages 806-834
Published in print August 2011 | ISSN: 0013-8266
Published online August 2011 | e-ISSN: 1477-4534 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ehr/cer201
Piety, Profit and Public Service in the Financial Revolution

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • British History
  • World History
  • European History
  • International History

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article reconsiders, through the case study of High Tory MP Sir Humphrey Mackworth (1657-1727), an influential thesis that core values of the landed class were incompatible with ‘projects’—new speculative commercial and industrial ventures floated in the emerging stock market. Rather than presupposing inherent tension between Whig and Tory, or Court and Country, the article explores how the High Tory, critical of Whig finance, conceptualized and lent legitimacy to his mining scheme. The first section reviews the historiography and the second introduces the case study. The article then shows that Mackworth viewed and promoted his business as a pursuit of piety, profit, and public service. This godly framework, it will be shown, was no rhetorical ornament: it even influenced how Mackworth understood the frauds he committed, which made him a notorious swindler but also an ‘innovative entrepreneur’ contributing to local economic development.

Journal Article.  14236 words. 

Subjects: British History ; World History ; European History ; International History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.