Journal Article

Malocclusion traits and symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in children with severe malocclusion

L Sonnesen, M Bakke and B Solow

in The European Journal of Orthodontics

Published on behalf of European Orthodontics Society

Volume 20, issue 5, pages 543-559
Published in print October 1998 | ISSN: 0141-5387
Published online October 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2210 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejo/20.5.543
Malocclusion traits and symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in children with severe malocclusion

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The present study reports the prevalence of the various traits of malocclusion, as well as the occurrence of associations between malocclusion, and symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children selected for orthodontic treatment by the new Danish procedure for screening the child population for severe malocclusions entailing health risks.

The sample comprised 104 children (56 F, 48 M) aged 7-13. Malocclusion traits were recorded at the time of selection, symptoms and signs of TMD were recorded at recall. The most prevalent malocclusion traits were distal molar occlusion (Angle Class II; 72 per cent), crowding (57 per cent), extreme maxillary overjet (37 per cent) and deep bite (31 per cent). Agenesis or peg-shaped lateral teeth were observed in 14 per cent of the children. The most prevalent symptom of TMD was weekly headache (27 per cent); the most prevalent signs of TMD were tenderness in the anterior temporal, occipital, trapezius, and superficial and profound masseter muscles (39-34 per cent). Seven per cent of the children were referred for TMD treatment. The Danish TMD screening procedure was positive in 26 per cent, while 20 per cent had severe symptoms (Aill), and 30 per cent had moderate signs (Dill) according to Helkimo (1974). Symptoms and signs of TMD were significantly associated with distal molar occlusion, extreme maxillary overjet, open bite, unilateral crossbite, midline displacement, and errors of tooth formation. The analysis suggests that there is a higher risk of children with severe malocclusions developing TMD. Errors of tooth formation in the form of agenesis or peg-shaped lateral teeth showed the largest number of associations with symptoms and signs of TMD; these associations have not previously been reported in the literature.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Restorative Dentistry and Orthodontics

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