Journal Article

Craniomandibular status and function in patients with habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea after nocturnal treatment with a mandibular advancement splint: a 2-year follow-up

L Bondemark and R Lindman

in The European Journal of Orthodontics

Published on behalf of European Orthodontics Society

Volume 22, issue 1, pages 53-60
Published in print February 2000 | ISSN: 0141-5387
Published online February 2000 | e-ISSN: 1460-2210 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejo/22.1.53
Craniomandibular status and function in patients with habitual snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea after nocturnal treatment with a mandibular advancement splint: a 2-year follow-up

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The aim of the investigation was to evaluate the status and function of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masticatory system in patients with habitual snoring and obstructive apnoea after 2 years nocturnal treatment with a mandibular advancement splint.

Thirty-two patients participated in the study, ranging from 43.0 to 79.8 years of age (mean 54.4 years, SD 8.78) at the start of treatment. All patients had been referred from the ENT department for treatment with a mandibular advancement splint. The acrylic splint advanced the mandible 50-70 per cent of maximal protrusion, opened 5 mm vertically, and was used 6-8 hours per night and 5-7 nights per week. Overjet, overbite, and molar relationship were measured on dental casts. The patients were asked to answer a questionnaire concerning symptoms of craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD). They were also clinically examined in a standardized manner, including registration of range of mandibular movements, TMJ sounds, pain on movement, and palpatory tenderness of the TMJ and the masticatory muscles.

None of the patients showed more than five symptoms of dysfunction either at the start of or after 2 years of treatment. A decrease in the frequency of headache was found for nine of those 18 patients that reported headache (P=0.004). A minor, but significant decrease in overjet and overbite was found and the molar relationship was also changed.

It was concluded that 2 years' treatment with a mandibular advancement splint had no adverse effects on the craniomandibular status and function, but the observed occlusal changes requires further evaluation.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Restorative Dentistry and Orthodontics

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