Journal Article

The effects of reconditioning on the slot dimensions and static frictional resistance of stainless steel brackets

S. P. Jones, C. C. H. Tan and E. H. Davies

in The European Journal of Orthodontics

Published on behalf of European Orthodontics Society

Volume 24, issue 2, pages 183-190
Published in print April 2002 | ISSN: 0141-5387
Published online April 2002 | e-ISSN: 1460-2210 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejo/24.2.183
The effects of reconditioning on the slot dimensions and static frictional resistance of stainless steel brackets

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This study investigated the effects of reconditioning on the slot dimensions and the static frictional resistance of stainless steel brackets at 0, 5, and 10 degrees bracket/archwire angulation. A sample of 45 used, commercially reconditioned 0.018 × 0.030 inch stainless steel standard edgewise brackets was compared with a matched sample of 45 new brackets.

The slot dimensions of 15 new and 15 reconditioned brackets were examined using a photomicroscope. With new brackets both the occluso‐gingival slot width (x̄ = 0.0197 inch) and slot depth (x̄ = 0.0304 inch) exceeded the manufacturer's nominal dimensions of 0.018 × 0.030 inch. The reconditioning process resulted in a further increase in slot width (x̄ = 0.0205 inch), which was statistically significant (P = 0.028), and a reduction in slot depth (x̄ = 0.0291 inch), which was highly statistically significant (P = 0.002). This may be attributable to preferential metal removal by the electro‐polishing phase of the reconditioning process.

Friction testing of 30 new and 30 reconditioned brackets demonstrated that both showed an increase in binding effects as the bracket/archwire angulation was increased from 0 to 5–10 degrees. However, the changes in slot dimensions secondary to reconditioning did not result in a statistically significant difference in mean static frictional resistance when the two bracket types were compared.

Although the brackets were altered physically by the reconditioning process, their performance during simulated sliding mechanics was not adversely affected. This implies that reconditioning may not result in clinically significant effects.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Restorative Dentistry and Orthodontics

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