Journal Article

An investigation into the use of two polyacid-modified composite resins (compomers) and a resin-modified glass poly(alkenoate) cement used to retain orthodontic bands

P. H. Williams, M. Sherriff and A. J. Ireland

in The European Journal of Orthodontics

Published on behalf of European Orthodontics Society

Volume 27, issue 3, pages 245-251
Published in print June 2005 | ISSN: 0141-5387
Published online June 2005 | e-ISSN: 1460-2210 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejo/cji009
An investigation into the use of two polyacid-modified composite resins (compomers) and a resin-modified glass poly(alkenoate) cement used to retain orthodontic bands

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The aim of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of a conventional glass poly(alkenoate) cement (Intact) and newer polyacid-modified composite resin cements (Transbond™ Plus and Ultra Band-Lok™) to retain orthodontic bands.

In the in vitro part of this study, stainless steel bands were cemented to 240 extracted third molar teeth in three test groups comprising Intact, Transbond™ Plus and Ultra Band-Lok™. The force to deband (N) for all three cements was recorded using an Instron universal testing machine after the following observation periods: 20 minutes and 3, 6 and 12 months. The results indicated that all three cements increased their median force to deband after 12 months. Of the two compomers, Transbond™ Plus demonstrated the highest median force to deband at all four time intervals.

In the in vivo part of the study, 30 patients participated in a randomized cross-mouth clinical trial where the molar bands were cemented in place using either Intact or Transbond™ Plus. Ultra Band-Lok™ was not used in the clinical part of the study. The results showed there to be no clinically significant difference in band failure rates between the two cements. When patients were asked to score each for taste, there was a significant difference, with the glass poly(alkenoate) cement (Intact) being more acceptable than the polyacid-modified composite Transbond™ Plus (P < 0.001).

No significant differences were observed in the in vitro median force to deband or in vivo band failure rates between the glass poly(alkenoate) cement and the polyacid-modified composite resins. The choice of cementing agent can therefore be made on patient factors, e.g. taste, or operator factors, e.g. ease of handling, cost and shelf life.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Restorative Dentistry and Orthodontics

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