Journal Article

Soft tissue facial angles in Down's syndrome subjects: a three-dimensional non-invasive study

Virgilio F. Ferrario, Claudia Dellavia, Graziano Serrao and Chiarella Sforza

in The European Journal of Orthodontics

Published on behalf of European Orthodontics Society

Volume 27, issue 4, pages 355-362
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 0141-5387
Published online August 2005 | e-ISSN: 1460-2210 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejo/cji017
Soft tissue facial angles in Down's syndrome subjects: a three-dimensional non-invasive study

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Restorative Dentistry and Orthodontics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The aim of the present study was to obtain quantitative information concerning the three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of the facial soft tissues of subjects with Down's syndrome. The 3D co-ordinates of 50 soft tissue facial landmarks were recorded by an electromechanical digitizer in 17 male and 11 female subjects with Down's syndrome aged 12–45 years, and in 429 healthy individuals of the same age, ethnicity and gender. From the landmark co-ordinates, geometric calculations were obtained of several 3D facial angles: facial convexity in the horizontal plane (upper facial convexity, mid facial convexity including the nose, and lower facial convexity), mandibular corpus convexity in the horizontal plane, facial convexity including the nose, facial convexity excluding the nose, interlabial angle, nasolabial angle, angle of nasal convexity, left and right soft tissue gonial angles. Data were compared with that collected for the normal subjects by computing the z-scores.

Facial convexity in the horizontal plane (both in the upper and mid facial third), facial convexity in the sagittal plane and the angle of nasal convexity were significantly (P < 0.05) increased (flatter) in subjects with Down's syndrome than in the normal controls. Both left and right soft tissue gonial angles were significantly reduced (more acute) in the Down's syndrome subjects. Subjects with Down's syndrome had a more hypoplastic facial middle third with reduced nasal protrusion, and a reduced lower facial third (mandible) than reference, normal subjects.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Restorative Dentistry and Orthodontics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.