Chapter

News power, crime and media justice

Chris Greer and Eugene McLaughlin

in The Oxford Handbook of Criminology

Sixth edition

Published on behalf of Oxford University Press

Published in print May 2017 | ISBN: 9780198719441
Published online September 2017 | e-ISBN: 9780191793509 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/he/9780198719441.003.0012
News power, crime and media justice

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Criminology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

News corporations are reconstituting and dramatically extending their power to shape crime consciousness and influence criminal justice rhetoric and practice. At the same time, in depth crime news research has fallen off the criminological radar. In this chapter we argue that because criminologists have not kept pace with the transforming news environment, the relations between news power, crime, and criminal justice remain under-researched and under-conceptualized. We begin by revisiting two concepts that continue to dominate UK crime news research: news values and moral panic. Though these concepts are still important for understanding news power, crime, and criminal justice, there has been a qualitative shift in how increasingly adversarial corporations manufacture crime news in a 24/7 digital environment. We identify ‘trial by media’ and ‘scandal hunting’ as journalistic practices that news corporations are perfecting through the relentless exposure of institutional failure as the cause of a systemic crisis in public protection and criminal justice. It is in this intermediatized context that we situate the shift from criminal justice to media justice.

Keywords: crime news; digitalization; institutional scandal; intermediatization; moral panic; newsworthiness; news power; news values; punitive turn; scandal hunting; tabloidization; trial by media; victim campaigns

Chapter.  10857 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Criminology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.