Journal Article

An analysis of the development of Canadian food fortification policies: the case of vitamin B

Tasnim Nathoo, Christina P. Holmes and Aleck Ostry

in Health Promotion International

Volume 20, issue 4, pages 375-382
Published in print December 2005 | ISSN: 0957-4824
Published online June 2005 | e-ISSN: 1460-2245 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dai015
An analysis of the development of Canadian food fortification policies: the case of vitamin B

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The concept of fortification, or the deliberate addition of synthetic vitamins to food, arose for the first time in Canada during the 1930s. The availability of new technology introduced a debate over the merits of food fortification as a tool to improve the nutritional health of the population. Through the use of two case studies, vitamin B1 (thiamin) in the 1930s and vitamin B9 (folic acid) in the 1990s, this paper examines the development of Canadian policies on food fortification. It presents early ideas about the use of food fortification to improve the health of the population, discusses shifts in attitudes toward fortification, and examines the intersections between scientific knowledge, trade considerations, and public health concerns.

Keywords: food policy; fortification; nutrition

Journal Article.  5023 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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