Journal Article

Promoting employee wellbeing: the relevance of work characteristics and organizational justice

Katrina J. Lawson, Andrew J. Noblet and John J. Rodwell

in Health Promotion International

Volume 24, issue 3, pages 223-233
Published in print September 2009 | ISSN: 0957-4824
Published online July 2009 | e-ISSN: 1460-2245 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dap025
Promoting employee wellbeing: the relevance of work characteristics and organizational justice

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SUMMARY

Research focusing on the relationship between organizational justice and health suggests that perceptions of fairness can make significant contributions to employee wellbeing. However, studies examining the justice–health relationship are only just emerging and there are several areas where further research is required, in particular, the uniqueness of the contributions made by justice and the extent to which the health effects can be explained by linear, non-linear and/or interaction models. The primary aim of the current study was to determine the main, curvilinear and interaction effects of work characteristics and organizational justice perceptions on employee wellbeing (as measured by psychological health and job satisfaction). Work characteristics were measured using the demand–control–support (DCS) model (Karasek and Theorell, 1990) and Colquitt's (2001) four justice dimensions (distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational) assessed organizational justice (Colquitt, 2001). Hierarchical regression analyses found that in relation to psychological health, perceptions of justice added little to the explanatory power of the DCS model. In contrast, organizational justice did account for unique variance in job satisfaction, the second measure of employee wellbeing. The results supported linear relationships between the psychosocial working conditions and the outcome measures. A significant two-way interaction effect (control × support at work) was found for the psychological health outcome and the procedural justice by distributive justice interaction was significant for the job satisfaction outcome. Notably, the findings indicate that in addition to traditional job stressors, health promotion strategies should also address organizational justice.

Keywords: workplace health promotion; employee wellbeing; organizational justice; job stress

Journal Article.  5951 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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