Journal Article

A nutrition labeling intervention in worksite cafeterias: an implementation evaluation across two large catering companies in the Netherlands

Ellis L. Vyth, Esther W. C. Van Der Meer, Jacob C. Seidell and Ingrid H. M. Steenhuis

in Health Promotion International

Volume 27, issue 2, pages 230-237
Published in print June 2012 | ISSN: 0957-4824
Published online June 2011 | e-ISSN: 1460-2245 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapro/dar034
A nutrition labeling intervention in worksite cafeterias: an implementation evaluation across two large catering companies in the Netherlands

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By both increasing the availability of healthy foods and labeling these products with the Choices logo, caterers may facilitate employees to make a healthier choice in their worksite cafeterias. The aim of this study was to explore which attributes influence the implementation of the Choices logo in worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were completed by catering managers of 316 cafeterias of two large caterers in the Netherlands (response rate 49.8%). Attributes from the Diffusion of Innovations Theory were used to investigate whether they could predict implementation. Compatibility (consistency with the beliefs of the catering manager; OR = 1.52), voluntariness (perception of the implementation as voluntary; OR = 0.50), result demonstrability (ability to communicate the implementation; OR = 1.52) and complexity in the sense of time (time needed for implementation; OR = 0.70) were the best predictors for the frequency of offering fresh Choices products (all significant). For the frequency of using Choices promotion material, voluntariness (OR = 0.54), result demonstrability (OR = 1.51) and relative advantage (perceived advantage of the implementation; OR = 1.44) were the best predictors (all significant). In conclusion, this study provides unique insights into which perceived attributes influence the implementation of a nutrition logo in worksite cafeterias. To increase the implementation, the Choices logo should be consistent with catering managers' ideas about healthy food, the workload of implementing the logo should be limited and it could be recommended to incorporate the logo in the health policy of the caterer.

Keywords: implementation; food labels; health promotion programs

Journal Article.  4065 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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