Journal Article

Donating blood and organs: using an extended theory of planned behavior perspective to identify similarities and differences in individual motivations to donate

Melissa K. Hyde, Simon R. Knowles and Katherine M. White

in Health Education Research

Volume 28, issue 6, pages 1092-1104
Published in print December 2013 | ISSN: 0268-1153
Published online August 2013 | e-ISSN: 1465-3648 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/her/cyt078
Donating blood and organs: using an extended theory of planned behavior perspective to identify similarities and differences in individual motivations to donate

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Public Health and Epidemiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Due to the critical shortage and continued need of blood and organ donations (ODs), research exploring similarities and differences in the motivational determinants of these behaviors is needed. In a sample of 258 university students, we used a cross-sectional design to test the utility of an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) including moral norm, self-identity and in-group altruism (family/close friends and ethnic group), to predict people’s blood and OD intentions. Overall, the extended TPB explained 77.0% and 74.6% of variance in blood and OD intentions, respectively. In regression analyses, common contributors to intentions across donation contexts were attitude, self-efficacy and self-identity. Normative influences varied with subjective norm as a significant predictor related to OD intentions but not blood donation intentions at the final step of regression analyses. Moral norm did not contribute significantly to blood or OD intentions. In-group altruism (family/close friends) was significantly related to OD intentions only in regressions. Future donation strategies should increase confidence to donate, foster a perception of self as the type of person who donates blood and/or organs, and address preferences to donate organs to in-group members only.

Journal Article.  5889 words. 

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.