Journal Article

Population genomics: a bridge from evolutionary history to genetic medicine

L.B. Jorde, W.S. Watkins and M.J. Bamshad

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 10, issue 20, pages 2199-2207
Published in print October 2001 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online October 2001 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/10.20.2199
Population genomics: a bridge from evolutionary history to genetic medicine

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Studies of human genetic variation are making contributions in several key areas. Evolutionary genetic studies yield critical clues about the histories of human populations, and they provide substantial support for an African origin of modern humans. The analysis of genetic variation has formed a foundation for DNA-based forensic applications. And, as attention is focused on locating genes underlying complex diseases, it is becoming clear that a better understanding of genetic variation will help to guide gene-mapping efforts. Population genomics, the large-scale comparison of DNA sequences, is now beginning to provide new insights in these areas. We review some of the general patterns of human genetic variation, and we show how our knowledge of these patterns can aid in the mapping and cloning of disease-causing genes.

Journal Article.  8426 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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