Journal Article

Loss of function of axonemal dynein <i>Mdnah5</i> causes primary ciliary dyskinesia and hydrocephalus

Inés Ibañez-Tallon, Svetlana Gorokhova and Nathaniel Heintz

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 11, issue 6, pages 715-721
Published in print March 2002 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online March 2002 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/11.6.715
Loss of function of axonemal dynein Mdnah5 causes primary ciliary dyskinesia and hydrocephalus

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Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), also known as Kartagener’s syndrome, is a human syndrome that results from ciliary dysfunction. This syndrome is characterized by recurrent respiratory infections, situs inversus and infertility. In some cases, hydrocephalus is also observed. We have characterized an insertional mutation in a mouse axonemal dynein heavy chain gene (Mdnah5) that reproduces most of the classical features of PCD, including recurrent respiratory infections, situs inversus and ciliary immotility. These mice also suffer from hydrocephalus and die perinatally. Electron microscopic studies demonstrate the loss of axonemal outer arms. These results show that mutations in Mdnah5 are a primary cause of PCD and provide direct evidence that mutations in an axonemal dynein can cause hydrocephalus. Mutations in the human DNAH5 have recently been identified in PCD patients. Comparison of the mouse model and the human data suggests that the degree of ciliary dysfunction is causally related to the severity of human PCD, particularly the presence of hydrocephalus.

Journal Article.  4333 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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