Journal Article

Mutations in CD2BP1 disrupt binding to PTP PEST and are responsible for PAPA syndrome, an autoinflammatory disorder

Carol A. Wise, Joseph D. Gillum, Christine E. Seidman, Noralane M. Lindor, Rose Veile, Stavros Bashiardes and Michael Lovett

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 11, issue 8, pages 961-969
Published in print April 2002 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online April 2002 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/11.8.961
Mutations in CD2BP1 disrupt binding to PTP PEST and are responsible for PAPA syndrome, an autoinflammatory disorder

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PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne, OMIM #604416) and familial recurrent arthritis (FRA) are rare inherited disorders of early onset, primarily affecting skin and joint tissues. Recurring inflammatory episodes lead to accumulation of sterile, pyogenic, neutrophil-rich material within the affected joints, ultimately resulting in significant destruction. We recently localized the genes for PAPA syndrome and FRA to chromosome 15q and suggested that they are the same disorder. We have now established this by the identification of co-segregating disease-causing mutations in the CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1; GenBank accession no XM 044569) gene in the two reported families with this disorder. E250Q or A230T amino acid substitutions occur within a domain highly homologous to yeast cleavage furrow-associated protein CDC15. CD2BP1 and its murine ortholog, proline–serine–threonine phosphatase interacting protein (PSTPIP1), are adaptor proteins known to interact with PEST-type protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). Yeast two-hybrid assays demonstrate severely reduced binding between PTP PEST and both the E250Q and A230T mutant proteins. Previous evidence supports the integral role of CD2BP1 and its interacting proteins in actin reorganization during cytoskeletal-mediated events. We hypothesize that the disease-causing mutations that we have identified compromise physiologic signaling necessary for the maintenance of proper inflammatory response. Accordingly we suggest classification of PAPA syndrome as an autoinflammatory disease. This CD2BP1-mediated biochemical pathway(s) may function in common inflammatory disorders with apparent etiological overlap, such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

Journal Article.  5832 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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