Journal Article

The <i>Drosophila</i> Developmental Gene Fat Facets Has a Human Homologue in Xp11.4 Which Escapes X-inactivation and Has Related Sequences on Yq11.2

Michael H. Jones, Robert A. Furlong, Heather Burkin, I. Jennifer Chalmers, Graeme M. Brown, Omar Khwaja and Nabeel A. Affara

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 5, issue 11, pages 1695-1701
Published in print November 1996 | ISSN: 0964-6906
e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/5.11.1695
The Drosophila Developmental Gene Fat Facets Has a Human Homologue in Xp11.4 Which Escapes X-inactivation and Has Related Sequences on Yq11.2

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EST 221 derived from human adult testis detects homology to the Drosophila fat facets gene (faf) and has related sequences on both the X and Y chromosomes mapping to Xp11.4 and Yq11.2 respectively. These two loci have been termed DFFRX and DFFRY for Drosophila fat facets related X and Y. The major transcript detected by EST 221 is ∼8 kb in size and is expressed widely in a range of 16 human adult tissues. RT-PCR analysis of 13 different human embryonic tissues with primers specific for the X and Y sequences demonstrates that both loci are expressed in developing tissues and quantitative RT-PCR of lymphoblastoid cell lines carrying different numbers of X chromosomes reveals that the X-linked gene escapes X-inactivation. The amino acid sequence (2547 residues) of the complete open reading frame of the X gene has 44% identity and 88% similarity to the Drosophila sequence and contains the conserved Cys and His domains characteristic of deubiquitinating enzymes, suggesting its biochemical function may be the hydrolysis of ubiquitin from protein-ubiquitin conjugates. The requirement of faffor normal oocyte development in Drosophila combined with the map location and escape from X-inactivation of DFFRX raises the possibility that the human homologue plays a role in the defects of oocyte proliferation and subsequent gonadal degeneration found in Turner syndrome.

Journal Article.  4363 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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