Journal Article

Characterization of a Cluster of Sulfatase Genes on Xp22.3 Suggests Gene Duplications in an Ancestral Pseudoautosomal Region

Germana Meroni, Brunella Franco, Nicoletta Archidiacono, Silvia Messali, Grazia Andolfi, Mariano Rocchi and Andrea Ballabio

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 5, issue 4, pages 423-431
Published in print April 1996 | ISSN: 0964-6906
e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/5.4.423
Characterization of a Cluster of Sulfatase Genes on Xp22.3 Suggests Gene Duplications in an Ancestral Pseudoautosomal Region

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An obligatory crossing-over event between the X and Y chromosomes in mammals occurs at each male meiosis within the 2.6 Mb of DNA defining the pseudoautosomal region (PAR). Genes located within or near the human PAR have homologous copies on the X and Y chromosomes, escape X inactivation and appear to be highly divergent throughout evolution. We have characterized the genomic structure of two genes from a recently identified cluster of sulfatase genes (ARSD and ARSE) located in the Xp22.3 region, and of their homologs on the Y chromosome. Our results indicate that the ARSD and ARSE genes from within this cluster have a conserved genomic organization, shared also by another Xp22.3 gene, STS, but completely different from that of all the other sulfatase genes. Sequence analysis of the Y-linked homologs indicate that they represent truncated pseudogenes. Sequence identity values between the X and Y copies of each gene is on average 91%, significantly higher than the values obtained by comparing different members of the family. FISH mapping experiments performed in several primate species revealed an identical localization of the X-linked copies to that in man, but different localizations of the Y homologs. Together, our data indicate that the cluster of sulfatase genes on human Xp22.3 was created through duplication events which probably occurred in an ancestral PAR, and support the view that the PAR has undergone multiple changes during recent mammalian evolution.

Journal Article.  5645 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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