Journal Article

A Fine-Scale Comparison of the Human and Chimpanzee Genomes: Linkage, Linkage Disequilibrium and Sequence Analysis

B. Crouau-Roy, S. Service, M. Slatkin and N. Freimer

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 5, issue 8, pages 1131-1137
Published in print August 1996 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online August 1996 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/5.8.1131
A Fine-Scale Comparison of the Human and Chimpanzee Genomes: Linkage, Linkage Disequilibrium and Sequence Analysis

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We have performed a fine-scale comparative study of the human and chimpanzee genomes, using linkage, linkage disequilibrium and sequence analyses on microsatellite loci spanning a region of approximately 30 cM on human chromosome 4p. Our results extend the findings of previous studies that indicated virtually complete conservation between the human and chimpanzee genomes at the chromosomal and sub-chromosomal level and port the hypothesis, derived from previous analyses of mitochondrial DNA, that chimpanzee populations are more diverse than human ones. By sequencing several human and chimpanzee alleles of two microsatellites we showed that base substitutions that diminish the length of perfect repeats (but do not change allele sizes) are probably responsible for the low heterozygosity of these loci in chimpanzees; our results suggest that the evolutionary history of microsatellites should not be inferred from comparisons of mean allele lengths between populations or species.

Journal Article.  4867 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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