Journal Article

A G→A Transition Creates a Branch Point Sequence and Activation of a Cryptic Exon, Resulting in the Hereditary Disorder Neurofibromatosis 2

Annelies De Klein, Peter H.J. Riegman, Emilia K. Bijlsma, Anneliek Heldoorn, Manja Muijtjens, Michael A. den Bakker, Cees J.J. Avezaat and Ellen C. Zwarthoff

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 7, issue 3, pages 393-398
Published in print March 1998 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online March 1998 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/7.3.393
A G→A Transition Creates a Branch Point Sequence and Activation of a Cryptic Exon, Resulting in the Hereditary Disorder Neurofibromatosis 2

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We describe a G→A transition within intron 5 of the NF2 gene. This mutation creates a consensus splice branch point sequence. To our knowledge this is the first report of a mutation that creates a functional branch point sequence in a human hereditary disorder. The new branch point sequence is located 18 bp upstream of a consensus splice acceptor site. A consensus splice donor site is found 106 bp 3′ of the acceptor site. As a consequence the G→A transition results in an alternatively spliced mRNA containing an additional exon 5a of 106 bp derived from intron sequences. We cloned the mutant cDNA and show that due to an in-frame stop codon the cDNA codes for a truncated NF2 protein. The mutation was observed in three affected members of an NF2 family. In a tumour of one of the family members both alternatively spliced and wild-type mRNA were found, although the wild-type allele of the gene is absent due to an interstitial deletion on chromosome 22. We also show that immunoprecipitations reveal the presence of full-length wild-type NF2 protein in the tumour lysate. These data support the hypothesis that some degree of normal splicing of the mutant precursor RNA is taking place. It is therefore likely that this residual activity of the mutant allele explains the relatively mild phenotype in the family. These data also indicate that complete inactivation of the gene is not required for tumour formation.

Journal Article.  4560 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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