Journal Article

Identical Mutation in Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2B Or Miyoshi Myopathy Suggests a Role for Modifier Gene(s)

Tracey Weiler, Rumaisa Bashir, Louise V. B. Anderson, Keith Davison, Jennifer A. Moss, Stephen Britton, Edward Nylen, Sharon Keers, Elizabeth Vafiadaki, Cheryl R. Greenberg, Kate M. D. Bushby and Klaus Wrogemann

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 8, issue 5, pages 871-877
Published in print May 1999 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online May 1999 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/8.5.871
Identical Mutation in Patients with Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2B Or Miyoshi Myopathy Suggests a Role for Modifier Gene(s)

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Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) and Miyoshi myopathy (MM), a distal muscular dystrophy, are both caused by mutations in the recently cloned gene dysferlin, gene symbol DYSF. Two large pedigrees have been described which have both types of patient in the same families. Moreover, in both pedigrees LGMD2B and MM patients are homozygous for haplotypes of the critical region. This suggested that the same mutation in the same gene would lead to both LGMD2B or MM in these families and that additional factors were needed to explain the development of the different clinical phenotypes. In the present paper we show that in one of these families Pro791 of dysferlin is changed to an Arg residue. Both the LGMD2B and MM patients in this kindred are homozygous for this mutation, as are four additional patients from two previously unpublished families. Haplotype analyses suggest a common origin of the mutation in all the patients. On western blots of muscle, LGMD2B and MM patients show a similar abundance in dysferlin staining of 15 and 11%, respectively. Normal tissue sections show that dysferlin localizes to the sarcolemma while tissue sections from MM and LGMD patients show minimal staining which is indistinguishable between the two types. These findings emphasize the role for the dysferlin gene as being responsible for both LGMD2B and MM, but that the distinction between these two clinical phenotypes requires the identification of additional factor(s), such as modifier gene(s).

Journal Article.  4606 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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