Journal Article

DNA copy-number analysis in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia reveals aberrations in genes involved in glutamate signaling

Gary M. Wilson, Stephane Flibotte, Vikramjit Chopra, Brianna L. Melnyk, William G. Honer and Robert A. Holt

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 15, issue 5, pages 743-749
Published in print March 2006 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddi489
DNA copy-number analysis in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia reveals aberrations in genes involved in glutamate signaling

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Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) at ∼1.4 Mbp resolution, we screened post-mortem brain DNA from bipolar disorder cases, schizophrenia cases and control individuals (n=35 each) for DNA copy-number aberrations. DNA copy number is a largely unexplored source of human genetic variation that may contribute risk for complex disease. We report aberrations at four loci which were seen in affected but not control individuals, and which were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. These aberrant loci contained the genes encoding EFNA5, GLUR7, CACNG2 and AKAP5; all brain-expressed proteins with known or postulated roles in neuronal function, and three of which (GLUR7, CACNG2 and AKAP5) are involved in glutamate signaling. A second cohort of psychiatric samples was also tested by quantitative PCR using the primer/probe sets for EFNA5, GLUR7, CACNG2 and AKAP5, and samples with aberrant copy number were found at three of the four loci (GLUR7, CACNG2 and AKAP5). Further scrutiny of these regions may reveal insights into the etiology and genetic risk factors for these complex psychiatric disorders.

Journal Article.  4870 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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