Journal Article

Statistical colocalization of monocyte gene expression and genetic risk variants for type 1 diabetes

Chris Wallace, Maxime Rotival, Jason D. Cooper, Catherine M. Rice, Jennie H.M. Yang, Mhairi McNeill, Deborah J. Smyth, David Niblett, François Cambien, Laurence Tiret, John A. Todd, David G. Clayton and Stefan Blankenberg

in Human Molecular Genetics

Volume 21, issue 12, pages 2815-2824
Published in print June 2012 | ISSN: 0964-6906
Published online March 2012 | e-ISSN: 1460-2083 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/dds098

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One mechanism by which disease-associated DNA variation can alter disease risk is altering gene expression. However, linkage disequilibrium (LD) between variants, mostly single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), means it is not sufficient to show that a particular variant associates with both disease and expression, as there could be two distinct causal variants in LD. Here, we describe a formal statistical test of colocalization and apply it to type 1 diabetes (T1D)-associated regions identified mostly through genome-wide association studies and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) discovered in a recently determined large monocyte expression data set from the Gutenberg Health Study (1370 individuals), with confirmation sought in an additional data set from the Cardiogenics Transcriptome Study (558 individuals). We excluded 39 out of 60 overlapping eQTLs in 49 T1D regions from possible colocalization and identified 21 coincident eQTLs, representing 21 genes in 14 distinct T1D regions. Our results reflect the importance of monocyte (and their derivatives, macrophage and dendritic cell) gene expression in human T1D and support the candidacy of several genes as causal factors in autoimmune pancreatic beta-cell destruction, including AFF3, CD226, CLECL1, DEXI, FKRP, PRKD2, RNLS, SMARCE1 and SUOX, in addition to the recently described GPR183 (EBI2) gene.

Journal Article.  7481 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Genetics and Genomics

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