Journal Article

Live births after autologous transplant of cryopreserved mouse ovaries.

K T Gunasena, P M Villines, E S Critser and J K Critser

in Human Reproduction

Published on behalf of European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology

Volume 12, issue 1, pages 101-106
Published in print January 1997 | ISSN: 0268-1161
Published online January 1997 | e-ISSN: 1460-2350 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/12.1.101
Live births after autologous transplant of cryopreserved mouse ovaries.

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The fertility of mice after autologous transplantation of ovaries, before or after cryopreservation, was investigated in this study. Female mice were randomly assigned to either sham-operated (n = 14), ovariectomized (n = 11), fresh (n = 12) or cryopreserved (n = 11) ovarian transplant groups. Ovaries were cryopreserved in 1.4 M dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) by cooling to -55 degrees C at 0.5 degree C/min (ice nucleation at -7 degrees C), plunged in liquid nitrogen and then thawed at room temperature. Oestrous cyclicity was observed 7 days after sham operation or 15 days after fresh or cryopreserved ovarian transplant. Ovariectomized animals did not demonstrate oestrous cyclicity but were mated, and no pregnancies resulted. Live births were recorded from all sham-operated, all fresh transplant, and 8/11 (73%) cryopreserved transplant animals. Overall mean +/- SEM litter sizes from fresh (4.32 +/- 0.44) and cryopreserved (4.71 +/- 0.57) transplant groups were smaller (P < 0.05) than those of sham-operated animals (12.54 +/- 0.44), although the sizes were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from each other. Animals were mated at least four times, with four litters of live pups from 4/4 sham-operated, 1/10 fresh and 1/9 cryopreserved ovarian transplant animals. Litter sizes from pups of sham-operated and transplant animals were not significantly different from each other. Following autologous transplantation of mouse ovaries, before or after cryopreservation, offspring appeared normal, with high rates of fertility.

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Subjects: Reproductive Medicine

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