Journal Article

Indications of competition between non-indigenous round goby and native flounder in the Baltic Sea

Agnes M. L. Karlson, Gustaf Almqvist, Krzysztof E. Skóra and Magnus Appelberg

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 64, issue 3, pages 479-486
Published in print April 2007 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online February 2007 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsl049
Indications of competition between non-indigenous round goby and native flounder in the Baltic Sea

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Environmental Science
  • Marine and Estuarine Biology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Karlson, A. M. L., Almqvist, G., Skóra, K. E., and Appelberg, M. 2007. Indications of competition between non-indigenous round goby and native flounder in the Baltic Sea. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 479–486.

The Ponto-Caspian round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) was introduced to the Gulf of Gdańsk, southern Baltic Sea, in the late 1980s, and it has now become the dominant demersal fish species in shallow water. This study aimed to assess diet preferences and the degree of diet overlap between the round goby and the native flounder (Platichthys flesus). Results from time-series of stomach contents and stable isotope analyses of wild-caught fish, together with prey preference experiments carried out in the laboratory, showed that the two species consumed similar species and sizes of prey. The similarities in diet suggest potential for food competition. Catch data showed both reverse depth distributions of round goby and flounder when round gobies were abundant and that the abundances of the two species were negatively correlated. The diet overlap between small flounders and round gobies was greatest when goby abundance was least, suggesting that abundance of round gobies may restrict flounder habitat utilization and, therefore, also food availability to the latter. Therefore, round gobies may have a negative influence on the commercially important flounder.

Keywords: diet overlap; diet preference; invasive species; ontogenetic diet shifts; stable isotopes

Journal Article.  5682 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.