Journal Article

Potential benefits from improved selectivity in the northwest Mediterranean multispecies trawl fishery

Nixon Bahamon, Francesc Sardà and Petri Suuronen

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 64, issue 4, pages 757-760
Published in print May 2007 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online May 2007 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsm052
Potential benefits from improved selectivity in the northwest Mediterranean multispecies trawl fishery

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Bahamon, N., Sardà, F., and Suuronen, P. 2007. Potential benefits from improved selectivity in the northwest Mediterranean multispecies trawl fishery. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 757–760.

The management scheme in the northwest Mediterranean multispecies demersal fishery is based largely on technical measures such as minimum mesh and landing sizes. However, selectivity of the trawls used is poor, and large numbers of juvenile fish are caught. We assess the consequences of improved gear selectivity for European hake, Norway lobster, poor cod, and greater forkbeard by assuming that the whole fleet would switch from the current 40 mm diamond-mesh to a 40 mm square-mesh (SM40) codend. The results suggest that, immediately after implementation, the yield-per-recruit (Y/R) would be reduced by up to 20% for the three fish species but that, within five years, the Y/R of European hake would increase by > 50 %, provided fishing effort did not change markedly. For poor cod and greater forkbeard, the comparable increases would be more moderate, whereas for Norway lobster, the gains would only be small. Overall, marked long-term benefits might be obtained by changing to SM40 codends.

Keywords: European hake; improved selectivity; multispecies trawl fishery; Norway lobster; yield predictions

Journal Article.  1818 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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