Journal Article

A strategy for developing scientific sampling tools for fishery-independent surveys of estuarine fish in New South Wales, Australia

D. Rotherham, A. J. Underwood, M. G. Chapman and C. A. Gray

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 64, issue 8, pages 1512-1516
Published in print November 2007 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online July 2007 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsm096
A strategy for developing scientific sampling tools for fishery-independent surveys of estuarine fish in New South Wales, Australia

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Rotherham, D., Underwood, A. J., Chapman, M. G., and Gray, C. A. 2007. A strategy for developing scientific sampling tools for fishery-independent surveys of estuarine fish in New South Wales, Australia. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 1512–1516.

The limitations of using fishery-dependent data, i.e. from commercial and recreational fisheries to assess harvested stocks of fish and invertebrates, are well known. Increasingly, fishery-independent surveys are used to validate data from fishery-dependent sources and to provide indices of recruitment and broader ecological information about species not normally retained in fishing operations. Any large-scale, long-term, fishery-independent study must develop sampling gear and designs that are standardized, representative, optimal with respect to the quantity and structure of catch, and replicated over relevant spatial and temporal scales. We present a strategy for achieving appropriate sampling designs. This involves: (i) identifying suitable sampling gears for target species; (ii) testing different configurations of gear and sampling practices to ensure that samples are optimal, representative, and cost efficient; (iii) understanding scales of spatial and temporal variability; and (iv) cost–benefit analyses to optimize replication. Examples of this strategy are illustrated, with brief considerations of the values of pilot research in developing fishery-independent sampling.

Keywords: cost–benefit analysis; fishery-independent survey; pilot study; spatial and temporal variation; standardized sampling

Journal Article.  3385 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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