Journal Article

A post-processing technique to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio and remove echosounder background noise

Alex De Robertis and Ian Higginbottom

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 64, issue 6, pages 1282-1291
Published in print September 2007 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online September 2007 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsm112
A post-processing technique to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio and remove echosounder background noise

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De Robertis, A., and Higginbottom, I. 2007. A post-processing technique to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio and remove echosounder background noise. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 64: 1282–1291.

A simple and effective post-processing technique to estimate echosounder background-noise levels and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) during active pinging is developed. Similar to other methods of noise estimation during active pinging, this method assumes that some portion of the sampled acoustic signal is dominated by background noise, with a negligible contribution from the backscattered transmit signal. If this assumption is met, the method will provide robust and accurate estimates of background noise equivalent to that measured by the receiver if the transmitter were disabled. It provides repeated noise estimates over short intervals of time without user intervention, which is beneficial in cases where background noise changes over time. In situations where background noise is dominant in a portion of the recorded signal, it is straightforward to make first-order corrections for the effects of noise and to estimate the SNR to evaluate the effects of background noise on acoustic measurements. Noise correction and signal-to-noise-based thresholds have the potential to improve inferences from acoustic measurements in lower signal-to-noise situations, such as when surveying from noisy vessels, using multifrequency techniques, surveying at longer ranges, and when working with weak acoustic targets such as invertebrates and fish lacking swimbladders.

Keywords: background noise; echo integration; echosounder; signal-to-noise ratio

Journal Article.  6390 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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