Journal Article

Institutions, constitutions, actor strategies, and ideas: Explaining variation in paid parental leave policies in Canada and the United States

Linda A. White

in International Journal of Constitutional Law

Published on behalf of The New York University School of Law

Volume 4, issue 2, pages 319-346
Published in print April 2006 | ISSN: 1474-2640
Published online April 2006 | e-ISSN: 1474-2659 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icon/mol007
Institutions, constitutions, actor strategies, and ideas: Explaining variation in paid parental leave policies in Canada and the United States

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Constitutional and Administrative Law
  • UK Politics

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article analyzes the reasons for cross-national differences in the legal and policy regimes related to maternity and parental leave in Canada and the United States. It explores why the Canadian federal government implemented a paid maternity leave policy much earlier than the U.S. It also explores why the U.S. had no national parental leave provisions before 1993 and why it does not have national paid leave provisions now. The article weighs the impact of institutional, constitutional, agential, and ideational/normative factors to explain policy differences in the two countries. While key institutional structures, such as federalism, and key court decisions have shaped maternity and parental leave policies substantially in the two countries, an important part of the explanation for the cross-national differences lies with how interests mobilize in response to past policy actions and legal norms and traditions.

Journal Article.  12440 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law ; UK Politics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.