Journal Article

Iraq's Constitution of 2005: Liberal consociation as political prescription

John McGarry and Brendan O’Leary

in International Journal of Constitutional Law

Published on behalf of The New York University School of Law

Volume 5, issue 4, pages 670-698
Published in print October 2007 | ISSN: 1474-2640
Published online September 2007 | e-ISSN: 1474-2659 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icon/mom026
Iraq's Constitution of 2005: Liberal consociation as political prescription

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Democracies have two basic choices for managing ethnic, national, and religious diversity. They may seek to construct a single all-embracing public identity through “integration” or try to accommodate dual or multiple public identities through “consociation.” These are the two dominant, broad-based prescriptions that are offered for addressing the conflict in Iraq. In this article, we argue that Iraq's new Constitution, ratified in 2005, reflects a “liberal” form of consociation that accommodates Iraq's democratically mobilized communities. We examine in detail the Constitution's provisions for both self-government and for shared government, and argue that these provisions represent a reasonable way forward for all of Iraq's citizens and peoples. The Constitution is defended against integrationist criticisms.

Journal Article.  12776 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law ; UK Politics

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