Journal Article

An Anglican Crisis of Comparison: Intersections of Race, Gender, and Religious Authority, with Particular Reference to the Church of Nigeria

Mary-Jane Rubenstein

in Journal of the American Academy of Religion

Published on behalf of American Academy of Religion

Volume 72, issue 2, pages 341-365
Published in print June 2004 | ISSN: 0002-7189
Published online June 2004 | e-ISSN: 1477-4585 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfh033
An Anglican Crisis of Comparison: Intersections of Race, Gender, and  Religious Authority, with Particular Reference to the Church of Nigeria

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The 1998 Lambeth Conference of the Anglican Communion brought into striking relief the two major issues dividing this particular global church: homosexuality and the ordination of women. Debates over these questions tend to split the church into its “conservative” southern dioceses and more “liberal” northern dioceses. With bishops from Africa and Southeast Asia now outnumbering their British and American counterparts, however, this rift had a surprising consequence at “Lambeth '98”: church leaders of the northern hemisphere found themselves having to accept the postcolonial South's interpretation of the very Scripture, ecclesiastical traditions, and sexual norms the North had imposed on the South in the first place. This article explores the Anglican Church's internal struggle over women's ordination and homosexuality as a site of internalized and redeployed colonial tactics—as a complex of racial, economic, and historical forces that far exceeds the logic of “reverse colonialism.”

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Religious Studies

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