Journal Article

Newly Found Jews and the Politics of Recognition

Stuart Z. Charmé

in Journal of the American Academy of Religion

Published on behalf of American Academy of Religion

Volume 80, issue 2, pages 387-410
Published in print June 2012 | ISSN: 0002-7189
Published online May 2012 | e-ISSN: 1477-4585 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jaarel/lfs028
Newly Found Jews and the Politics of Recognition

Show Summary Details

Preview

In the latter half of the twentieth century, tribal groups throughout Africa and Asia who regard themselves as Jews, such as the Abayudaya of South Africa and the Mizo of northern India and Burma, sought the recognition of their Jewishness by established Jewish communities in Israel and the United States. This process of recognition reflects different understandings of Jewish identity and different political agendas among the various Jewish groups who have become involved with advocacy for “newly found” Jews. For Israeli Jewish organizations, recognition is based on a more essentialist view of Jewishness and is oriented toward socializing “newly found” Jews toward Orthodox Judaism and preparation for immigration to Israel. Newer American Jewish organizations reflect greater denominational diversity and a more postmodern understanding of Jewishness as fluid and open-ended. They treat recognition as part of a commitment to Jewish diversity and multiculturalism, with less attention to traditional normative definitions of Jewish identity.

Journal Article.  8974 words. 

Subjects: Religious Studies

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.