Journal Article

Perioperative pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime in serum and bile during continuous and intermittent infusion in liver transplant patients

S. E. Buijk, I. C. Gyssens, J. W. Mouton, H. J. Metselaar, T. H. Groenland, H. A. Verbrugh and H. A. Bruining

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Published on behalf of British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Volume 54, issue 1, pages 199-205
Published in print July 2004 | ISSN: 0305-7453
Published online July 2004 | e-ISSN: 1460-2091 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkh268
Perioperative pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime in serum and bile during continuous and intermittent infusion in liver transplant patients

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  • Medical Oncology
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Background: Drug pharmacokinetics may be altered during liver transplantation. Cefotaxime (CTX), used as perioperative prophylaxis, demonstrates time-dependent killing and therefore continuous infusion might have pharmacodynamic advantages.

Objectives: To determine the pharmacokinetics of CTX and desacetylcefotaxime (DCTX) in serum, bile and urine during continuous and intermittent infusion when performing liver transplantation.

Methods: Fifteen patients undergoing liver transplantation were studied after continuous infusion (CI) (4000 mg iv per 24 h following a loading dose of 1000 mg) and intermittent bolus infusion (BI) (1000 mg iv four times daily). Samples were collected during the first 48 h after liver transplantation. Concentrations of CTX and DCTX were determined by HPLC.

Results: During surgery, the mean concentration in serum after CI was 18 mg/L. The lowest serum concentration was 5 mg/L in the CI group and levels were undetectable in the BI group. Target serum concentrations of ≥4 mg/L were reached for 100% of the dosing interval during CI and ∼60% during BI. Post-operatively, the mean concentration in serum after CI was 26 mg/L. The lowest serum concentration was 8 mg/L in the CI group and levels were undetectable after BI. The peroperative pharmacokinetics of CTX in this patient group were deranged and variable, mainly caused by an increased volume of distribution and decreased hepatic clearance. Metabolism was hampered, but DCTX area under the curve (AUC)/CTX AUC ratios varying between 0.7–0.9 were reached peroperatively. Post-operatively, DCTX AUC/CTX AUC ratios were higher (1.1–1.4). Unchanged CTX in bile was ∼0.1% of the administered dose, leading to concentrations >4 mg/L throughout the dosing interval for both regimens.

Conclusion: Although an intermittent bolus infusion of CTX 1000 mg produces t > target concentration for 60% of the dosing interval during liver transplantation, serum concentrations may be insufficient during the reperfusion phase. Continuous infusion overcomes this. Post-operatively, CTX clearance is impaired by decreased metabolic clearance and there is substantial accumulation of DCTX. In bile, sufficient concentrations of CTX and its active metabolite are reached with both regimens.

Keywords: antibiotics; critical care; surgery; pharmacodynamics; desacetylcefotaxime

Journal Article.  4520 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medical Oncology ; Critical Care

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