Journal Article

Activity of capuramycin analogues against <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i>, <i>Mycobacterium avium</i> and <i>Mycobacterium intracellulare</i> <i>in vitro</i> and <i>in vivo</i>

Tetsufumi Koga, Takashi Fukuoka, Norio Doi, Tamako Harasaki, Harumi Inoue, Hitoshi Hotoda, Masayo Kakuta, Yasunori Muramatsu, Naotoshi Yamamura, Misa Hoshi and Takashi Hirota

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Published on behalf of British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Volume 54, issue 4, pages 755-760
Published in print October 2004 | ISSN: 0305-7453
Published online October 2004 | e-ISSN: 1460-2091 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkh417
Activity of capuramycin analogues against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in vitro and in vivo

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Objectives: The antimycobacterial activities of RS-112997, RS-124922 and RS-118641, three capuramycin analogues that inhibit phospho-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide translocase, were tested against clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

Methods and results: MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method using a modified Middlebrook 7H9 broth. RS-118641 was the most potent compound overall. The MIC50/90 (mg/L) results for RS-118641 were: M. tuberculosis, 1/2; multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis, 0.5/2; M. avium, 4/8; and M. intracellulare, 0.06/0.5. No statistically significant differences in MIC distributions were observed between non-MDR and MDR M. tuberculosis for any of the capuramycin analogues tested. In order to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of RS-112997 and RS-124922 in a murine lung model of tuberculosis, both compounds were administered intranasally at 0.1 or 1 mg/mouse/day for 12 days. The mycobacterial load in the lungs was significantly lower in all treatment groups than in the untreated controls. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the three compounds against the M. intracellulare infection in mice. All compounds were administered intranasally at 0.1 mg/mouse/day for 21 days. The mycobacterial load in the lungs was significantly lower in all treatment groups than in the untreated controls.

Conclusions: These results suggest that capuramycin analogues exhibit strong antimycobacterial potential and should be considered for further evaluation in the treatment of M. tuberculosis and M. aviumM. intracellulare complex infections in humans.

Keywords: mycobacteria; antimycobacterials; translocase I; peptidoglycan

Journal Article.  3480 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medical Oncology ; Critical Care

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