Journal Article

Whole blood-mediated endothelial permeability and adhesion molecule expression: a model study into the effects of bacteria and antibiotics

Arjan Nooteboom, Cees J. van der Linden and Thijs Hendriks

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Published on behalf of British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Volume 55, issue 2, pages 150-156
Published in print February 2005 | ISSN: 0305-7453
Published online February 2005 | e-ISSN: 1460-2091 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkh526
Whole blood-mediated endothelial permeability and adhesion molecule expression: a model study into the effects of bacteria and antibiotics

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Aim: To investigate whether the inflammatory response of cultured endothelial cells, as induced by conditioned plasma, depends on the bacterial species or type of antibiotic used for incubation with whole blood.

Materials and methods: Blood from healthy volunteers was stimulated ex vivo with different microorganisms, and with bacteria killed with different antibiotics. The resultant plasmas were incubated on monolayers of cultured human endothelial cells, followed by measurement of their permeability to albumin and expression of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1.

Results: Incubation of Escherichia coli in blood yielded plasmas that induced a marked increase in endothelial permeability and E-selectin expression. The response to Bacteroides fragilis or Enterococcus faecalis was generally weaker. Similar effects were observed after incubation of whole blood with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Much of the permeability and adhesion molecule response to E. coli remained after removal of intact microorganisms from the culture. Whereas antibiotic treatment of E. coli with imipenem or cefuroxime resulted in a divergent production of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in blood, no significant differences between these treatments were observed with respect to the plasma-induced endothelial response.

Conclusion: Bacteria differ in their capacity to generate a whole blood-mediated increase of endothelial permeability and adhesion molecule expression; this response depends, at least in part, on the presence of soluble bacterial components, such as LPS. Whereas treatment with various antibiotics may generate varying amounts of TNF-α, these differences are not translated into differences in endothelial permeability or adhesion molecule expression.

Keywords: lipopolysaccharide; cytokines; sepsis; β-lactams; HUVEC

Journal Article.  5134 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medical Oncology ; Critical Care

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