Journal Article

Diversity of thymidine analogue resistance genotypes among newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected persons

J. Gerardo García-Lerma

in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Published on behalf of British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Volume 56, issue 2, pages 265-269
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 0305-7453
Published online June 2005 | e-ISSN: 1460-2091 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dki194
Diversity of thymidine analogue resistance genotypes among newly diagnosed HIV-1-infected persons

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  • Medical Oncology
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The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in a significant decrease in HIV and AIDS-related mortality and morbidity. However, these treatments can select for drug-resistant viruses which are associated with poor virological responses to the antiretroviral therapy and possible loss of clinical benefit. Drug-resistant viruses can also be transmitted between individuals. In the absence of drug pressure, transmitted drug-resistant viruses gradually lose resistance mutations that confer a selective disadvantage as they evolve to more fit viruses. As a result, unusual resistance-related genotypes not commonly seen in treated patients may arise in the population. Viruses with unique patterns of thymidine analogue-associated mutations (TAMs) have now been identified in a substantial proportion of treatment-naive recently diagnosed persons. In this leading article, I discuss these findings and the potential impact of these unique reverse transcriptase (RT) genotypes on evolution of resistance and treatment responses.

Keywords: revertant viruses; fitness; virus evolution

Journal Article.  3357 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Medical Oncology ; Critical Care

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