Journal Article

The Relative Buffering Capacities of Saliva and Moist Snuff: Implications for Nicotine Absorption

Laura A. Ciolino, Heather A. McCauley, Diane B. Fraser and Karen A. Wolnik

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

Volume 25, issue 1, pages 15-25
Published in print January 2001 | ISSN: 0146-4760
Published online January 2001 | e-ISSN: 1945-2403 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/25.1.15
The Relative Buffering Capacities of Saliva and Moist Snuff: Implications for Nicotine Absorption

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Commercial moist snuff products are used by placing a portion of tobacco inside the mouth between the inner cheek or lip and gum. Nicotine is absorbed into the blood stream via transfer across various oral membranes including the buccal mucosa (cheek lining). The resulting salivary pH when a given moist snuff product is placed in the mouth is an important factor for nicotine absorption because it will affect the proportion of free base nicotine that is readily available for absorption. The resulting salivary pH for a given moist snuff product will be determined in part by the relative acid-base buffering capacities of the saliva and moist snuff, as well as the pHs of the saliva and moist snuff prior to coming in contact with one another. In the current study, the acid-base buffering capacities (µeq/g) of a series of commercial moist snuff products were determined and compared to the acid-base buffering capacity for unstimulated, whole human saliva. The buffering capacities of the moist snuff products were determined to be 10–20 times higher than the buffering capacity of human saliva. The resulting salivary pH ranges after contact between an artifical saliva and the various moist snuff products were also determined; the results were used to predict the proportion of free base nicotine that can be expected to occur in the mouth during the first few minutes of product use. These studies provide a basis for examining and understanding the effects that moist snuff product pHs and buffering capacities may be expected to have on nicotine absorption.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Medical Toxicology ; Toxicology (Non-medical)

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