Journal Article

The Effect of Swallowing or Rinsing Alcohol Solution on the Mouth Alcohol Effect and Slope Detection of the Intoxilyzer 5000

J.G. Wigmore and G.M. Leslie

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

Volume 25, issue 2, pages 112-114
Published in print March 2001 | ISSN: 0146-4760
Published online March 2001 | e-ISSN: 1945-2403 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/25.2.112
The Effect of Swallowing or Rinsing Alcohol Solution on the Mouth Alcohol Effect and Slope Detection of the Intoxilyzer 5000

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Nine female and 21 male alcohol-free subjects introduced 10 mL of diluted gin (20% v/v alcohol) into their mouths under two conditions. The subjects either rinsed the alcohol for 10 s and then expectorated or immediately swallowed. They then provided breath samples into an Intoxilyzer 5000 at 5 and 10 min postadministration for both conditions. The mean Intoxilyzer results plus or minus one standard deviation (n = 30) were 0.091 ± 0.051; 0.036 ± 0.027; 0.014 ± 0.011, and 0.004 ± 0.006 g/210 L for 5 min after rinsing, 5 min after swallowing, 10 min after rinsing, and 10 min after swallowing, respectively. The percentages of times that mouth alcohol was correctly detected by the Intoxilyzer 5000 were 90%, 66%, 62% and 30% for these conditions, respectively. Ten minutes after the introduction of alcohol into the mouth, 63% of the Intoxilyzer results were > 0.010 g/210L after rinsing compared with only 7% after swallowing. The mouth alcohol effect is greater for rinsing than for swallowing alcohol.

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Subjects: Medical Toxicology ; Toxicology (Non-medical)

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