Journal Article

Development of a High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for the Simultaneous Determination of Pyrene-1,6- and 1,8-Dione in Animal and Human Urine

Asta Ruzgyte, Michèle Bouchard and Claude Viau

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

Volume 29, issue 6, pages 533-538
Published in print September 2005 | ISSN: 0146-4760
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1945-2403 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/29.6.533
Development of a High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for the Simultaneous Determination of Pyrene-1,6- and 1,8-Dione in Animal and Human Urine

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Medical Toxicology
  • Toxicology (Non-medical)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

A recent in vivo mass-balance study on the disposition of 14C-labelled pyrene in rats suggests that 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is not the major excreted metabolite. In that report, specific metabolites other than 1.OHP were not identified. The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify these unknown metabolites of pyrene in animal and human urine. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray-mass spectrometry method, it was observed that dioxygenated pyrene metabolites (m/z 233) were present in significant amounts in urine samples of rats treated with pyrene. An HPLC method with fluorescence detection was then developed for the simultaneous determination of pyrene-l,6- and 1,8-dioxygenated metabolites, that is, the sum of hydroquinone, semiquinone, and quinone forms of these metabolites, after derivatization into 1,6-diacetoxypyrene (P16Da) and 1,8-diacetoxypyrene (P18Da). The mean limits of detection (± standard deviation) were 46 ± 22 nmol P16Da/L and 86 ± 32 nmol P18Da/L, as calculated from standard solution curves. The intraday coefficient of variation in rats was 5.5% for P16Da and 7.2% for P18Da; in humans, it was 6.8% for P16Da and 7.4% for P18Da (n = 36 in each case). The day-to-day coefficients of variation in rats were 12.5% for P16Da and 7.3% for P18Da; in humans, they were 10.1% for P16Da and 7.2% for P18Da (n = 12 in each case). The recovery rates of these metabolites ranged between 89 and 126% in rats and between 100 and 121% in humans (n = 36 in each case). Interestingly, rat data showed that P16Da molar amounts in 24-h urine samples (n = 4) exceeded those of 1-OHP by 64 to 121 times and P18Da amounts exceeded those of 1-OHP by 13 to 35 times. Similarly, P16Da molar concentrations in spot urine samples of human subjects (n = 4) exposed to pyrene exceeded those of 1-OHP by 4 to 12 times while P18Da concentrations were 0.4 to 2 times those of 1-OHP. Pyrene-1,6- and 1,8-dioxygenated metabolites are major metabolites of pyrene and, particularly in the case of the 1,6-isomers, potentially useful biomarkers of both environmental and occupational exposure to pyrene.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Medical Toxicology ; Toxicology (Non-medical)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.