Journal Article

Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Sulfur Mustard-Plasma Protein Adducts: Validation and Use in a Rat Inhalation Model*

Benedict R. Capacio, J. Richard Smith, Richard J. Lawrence, Brian L. Boyd, Alicia M. Witriol, Michele L. Conti, Jennifer L. Collins and Alfred M. Sciuto

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

Volume 32, issue 1, pages 37-43
Published in print January 2008 | ISSN: 0146-4760
Published online January 2008 | e-ISSN: 1945-2403 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/32.1.37
Gas Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Sulfur Mustard-Plasma Protein Adducts: Validation and Use in a Rat Inhalation Model*

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Sulfur mustard (HD) is an alkylating agent that reacts rapidly with macromolecular targets resulting in the formation of stable adducts providing depots for markers of exposure. The purpose of this study was to validate an analytical procedure for detection of HD-plasma protein adducts and to establish the utility of the method in an HD rat inhalation study. Calibration curves were prepared in human and rat plasma at six levels of HD (12.5 to 400nM). Correlation coefficients for the mean data were 0.9987 for human and 0.9992 for rat plasma. The percent coefficient of variation (%CV) derived from the mean concentration data ranged from 0.53 to 14.1% in human (n = 5) and 0.57 to 10.63% in rat (n = 6) plasma. Intraday and interday precision and accuracy studies were conducted at three concentration levels (25, 150, 300nM) to represent low, medium, and high concentrations of HD relative to those employed in the calibration curve. Precision and accuracy were assessed by determining %CV and % error, respectively. For intra- and interday studies, the %CVs and absolute % errors were less than 15%. The limits of quantitation were 20.88nM for human and 16.73nM for rat plasma. In animal studies, rats received nebulized HD at six doses. The data indicate a dose-dependent relationship between maximal plasma concentrations and dose administered (R2 = 0.9728). Results from this study indicate an accurate, precise, and sensitive method. The method was useful in determining plasma protein adduct formation in a rat inhalation model.

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Subjects: Medical Toxicology ; Toxicology (Non-medical)

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