Journal Article

Determination of Drug Residues in Urine of Dogs Receiving Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy by Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Is There An Environmental or Occupational Risk?

Gerd Hamscher, Siegrun A.I. Mohring, Anna Knobloch, Nina Eberle, Heinz Nau, Ingo Nolte and Daniela Simon

in Journal of Analytical Toxicology

Volume 34, issue 3, pages 142-148
Published in print April 2010 | ISSN: 0146-4760
Published online April 2010 | e-ISSN: 1945-2403 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/34.3.142
Determination of Drug Residues in Urine of Dogs Receiving Anti-Cancer Chemotherapy by Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Is There An Environmental or Occupational Risk?

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Cytotoxic drugs, previously used only in human medicine, are increasingly utilized for cancer treatment in veterinary practice. We developed and validated a liquid chromatography (LC)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) method to determine vincristine, vinblastine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin in canine urine. Sample pretreatment consisted of liquid-liquid extraction, and LC separation was carried out on an RP C18 column employing a 0.5% formic acid/methanol gradient system. The analytes were detected in positive ion mode using the MS-MS scan mode. The mean recoveries in six different urine samples were between 64.2% and 86.9%. Limits of quantitation were 0.5 µg/L for vincristine and vinblastine, 1 µg/L for cyclophosphamide, and 5 µg/L for doxorubicin; limits of detection were approximately 0.25 µg/L for vincristine, vinblastine, and cyclophosphamide and 0.5 µg/L for doxorubicin. It could be demonstrated that all investigated drugs are found in urine of dogs undergoing chemotherapy. In samples from day 1 after chemotherapy, as much as 63 µg/L vincristine, 111 µg/L vinblastine, and 762 µg/L doxorubicin could be detected. Cyclophosphamide showed only minor concentrations on day 1, but up to 2583 µg/L could be found directly after chemotherapy. These initial data show that there might be a potential contamination risk when administering cytotoxics in veterinary medicine.

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Subjects: Medical Toxicology ; Toxicology (Non-medical)

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